Soaring

I recently had the chance to go flying in a glider.  A glider is an airplane without an engine, so it gets towed up by a powered plane.  The glider is released at the desired hight, and the glider pilot slowly descends back to the airport.  However, gliders actually are capable of climbing higher as well, using thermals and updrafts.  Thermals are pockets of rising hot air, which can carry a glider up.

Gliders are the sailboats of the sky, which is why they are sometimes referred to as sailplanes.  With no noise but the wind over the cockpit, it really is a beautiful experience.

The video above is some footage I took on my first glider flight.

 

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The Legend of the Stuffy Box

Stuffy BoxFor my twelfth birthday several years ago, my Grandpa Ross (who was a scout with the 30th troop in Hamilton) gave me a small box full of many little treasures. When I opened the box I found inside a rolled up ‘scroll’ bound by a birthday ribbon tied in a bow. The Scroll

You could tell it was (supposed to look) old because of the (tea bag) stains and marks all over it ;) I opened up the scroll and inside I read the following:

The Legend Of The ‘Stuffy Box’

What is a ‘Stuffy Box?,’ more common folk might ask … it is the beginning of a long journey.

Every twelve year old boy should have a stuffy box.

What is the origin of the stuffy box? Well, it is a modern day legend, and let me tell you that legends are very difficult to begin. In fact, this may be the only labelled stuffy box known to mankind, so you are at the beginning, Dorian!

The term stuffy box comes from your Great Grandpa Lloyd. When your Grandpa, Ross, was a boy, he enjoyed rummaging through his Dad’s little boxes that could be found in our shed. They could contain almost anything …. Screws, bolts, springs, washers, pieces of electric cord, broken pieces of plastic from a curtain rod, or whatever.

The great thing about Great Grandpa Lloyd is that he had a lot of stuffy boxes … you could find several in the shed, a couple in his personal desk, some near his easel and paint, easily one in the washroom, and on and on it goes. He is the true founder of the stuffy box movement.

You are now ready to begin your stuffy box journey. Dorian. Do so with honour and pride!

There are things about a stuffy box you should know. First, it can never be made of new material. It must always come from a pre-existing purpose. In your case, this stuffy box was a pre-existing wine box. The lid had to be reversed and many coats of Varathane were applied by your Grandma. Special wood letters were applied to make ownership unmistakable.

Second, the wise care of a stuffy box includes having one place to keep it where it never moves.

Third, it’s preferred if it gets scuffed and chaffed a bit. You want it to look rough and rustic. It’s a working man’s treasure box … in it you can keep anything you want … a favourite screw driver, coins, stamps, nuts and bolts, candy, a pocket knife, whatever. Odd stuff.

It’s not really a secret box … that is the stuff of another legend. It is more a place to put stuff when you don’t know where to put stuff.

Every few years it’s a good idea to add another stuffy box to your collection. It doesn’t have to look the same, or even be labeled … it just needs to be a good container for stuff. Make the year ahead be full of good stuff, Dorian. Collect good stuff. Do good stuff.

Love,

Grandpa Ross.

I have shared this letter with you so that you can begin your own stuffy box journey.  Please ‘Do so, with honour and pride!’

Lost on a Mountain in Maine

mountain-in-maine.jpeg

Here are a couple reflections on the book Lost on a Mountain in Main.

Twelve year old Donn Fendler becomes lost on Maine’s highest peak, Mount Kathadin. Donn spends the next nine days trapped alone in a deadly, miserable wilderness with an abundance of cold, rain, bugs, sharp rocks, and lethal precipices.

Throughout the adventure, despite great pain, fatigue, fear, and hunger, Donn shows extraordinary courage and a will to live.

The reader joins Donn in his fight to survive the brutal wilderness as he spends more than a week alone, with no more than the clothes on his back.

Here is an excerpt from the book, which you can buy here:

“… I had come back to the same sign. For a second I was stunned. I just stood there looking at it. I knew now, for sure, that I was lost. I was running in a circle. I didn’t know what to do, so I stumbled around looking for other marks, on that same trail. I guess I went a long way over rocks and over pucker bush and sometimes under it too, searching and hunting for another trail marker. I didn’t find any, but I kept going down. I remember that. After a while, I came to a place where there was a lot of gravel, and boy, was it slippery! That place was dangerous, for a slip might mean a bad fall – maybe a hundred feet or more. I slowed down. I could imagine myself lying there, in the cold and dark, with a sprained ankle. Meanwhile the rocks were getting bigger and bigger…”

A Dream Come True

IMG_0580.JPGWhen I first started learning to unicycle (in February 2016) my only goal was to be able to ride consistently.  After visiting my Great Uncle David in Toronto – who owns a collection of unicycles of various sizes and descriptions – and trying out some of his unicycles I began to realize how many possibilities there are with unicycling. I tried his five foot tall ‘giraffe,’ and the big ‘36er’ which has a wheel diameter of 3’. You can get going really fast on the 36er, so once you get one of those you don’t ever have to ride a bike again, unless of course, you want to…

Later that summer, after I was feeling more comfortable on my 20” trainer, I decided I was ready for an upgrade of some sort. The only one I found that was relatively within my price range was a used five foot tall giraffe that was a 2 hour drive away, and not on the way to anywhere I or my family really ever goes. I was also a little hesitant to pay the price they where asking, as I didn’t know what shape the unicycle was in. I was about to buy it, but prayed first.

I decided to wait a little longer, and literally the next day I found another ad in Toronto for a giraffe that was half the price of the other one, and it came with another 20” trainer as well! The seller was just trying to get rid of them. And, since I know people who go to Toronto fairly often, this was the perfect opportunity. My very kind Uncle David generously went out of his way to pick it up for me, and my Dad later picked it up while in Toronto for another reason.

Dad got back late, and the next morning told me to go look in the back of the van. I opened the van door, and pulled out a Norco Giraffe and a 20” trainer. I found that neither of them needed a new tube despite the seller saying they did, so I was able to start riding the giraffe right away. The whole story is an example of how God loves to give us good things. We can learn to wait on the LORD for some things instead of trying to figure out everything by ourselves. As the bible says:

Delight yourself also in the LORD: and he shall give you the desires of your heart.

That summer I posted a WANTED: UNICYCLES ad online, and started buying used unicycles, and selling some of them to friends after I had taught them how to ride. I was able to find a 24” uni (unicycle), which was fun because you can go a little faster than on a 20” uni (larger diameter = larger circumference = more SPEED).

Ever since I had ridden Uncle David’s 36er in Toronto, I had dreamed of getting one of my own. 36ers just fly! A 36er’s wheel is large enough that it is almost as fast as a bike. I looked all over Canada and the US for a used or new 36er at a good price, but could hardly find any that where affordable, or located somewhere I would be able to pick it up. I looked on UDC, Creigslist, Kijiji, and even considered buying all the components and building my own (which would have been pretty cool, but was also pretty expensive). I really wanted to get one but just couldn’t seem to find one that would be the right fit, so I talked to the LORD about it.

One day in March (of 2017) I was (half jokingly) trying to convince my Mom to buy one for me. She told me to talk to Jesus about it, because he loves to give us good things.

Literally ten minutes later I got an email from a guy named ‘Mike’ who was replying to the wanted ad for unicycles I had posted months ago. I could hardly believe my eyes as I read the message. He was selling his Qu-Ax 36er with some KH accesories on it, and it was for less than any of the unicycles I had previously looked at. And, it was only a 30 minute drive from my place!

I took this as a clear sign from God that this was the unicycle for me, and in less than two hours I was back home inspecting my very own 36er! After tinkering around and changing a few things on it, the next day I was happily riding around the tennis court. It was amazing to realize that God had just provided something I had been looking for for the past year. God loves to make dreams realities for his children, and for me, He had just made a Dream Come True.

Bottles in the Atlantic

In 2013 my family drove all the way to Nova Scotia, Canada, to visit extended family. We stayed at a cottage on a small lake called Lake Deception, near Shelburne, NS.

After launching canoes on the lake, we found that although the surface appears quite flat, there are many hidden rocks barely beneath the surface. We figured this could have been the reason behind the name Deception.

I found an empty glass bottle (the kind used for rootbeer, soda, or beer) that one of the previous renters chucked from the deck behind the cottage. It instantly gave me the idea to write a message, roll it up inside, and toss it into the lake, in the hopes that someone from one of the 10 or so other cottages along the lake would find it.

When my Uncle Ed heard of my plans, he took the idea to a whole new level, by suggesting I throw it in the ocean instead. He also gave me the idea of doing more than one bottle, so as to increase the chances of someone finding it, and even went out of his way to help me photocopy the note (which included my name and address and a request for the finder to write). I left all the ten notes with Ed. He told me that he had a friend at a liquor store, where he might be able to get some bottles.

Later that day while I was at a beach with my family, Ed pulled up in his mini-van and called me over to it.

He gave me a box of ten shinny, brand new, freshly sealed beer bottles. Inside each bottle was one of the notes, tightly rolled up and fastened with an elastic band. On each bottle was a crisp white cap with a red octopus that had a bottle instead of a head.

I put the bottles in our van, and later we drove as far towards the open sea as roads would allow, than walked for a bit on a path, ‘till we got to some rocks where you could see the frothing Atlantic Ocean right below.

My cousins, siblings, and I took turns lobbing the bottles off the cliff like hand-grenades, and watched as they bobbed gently up and down, moving slowly out to sea.

Uncle Ed had told me that it would take several months before the bottle caps would rust through, so if they had not been beached before then, they where goners.

After arriving home from NS (Nova Scotia), I wondered, is someone actually going to find one of these on a beach somewhere?  If so, how far away might they be?

A couple weeks later I got a letter in the mail from NS. Since it wasn’t from Uncle Ed or his family, I wondered who it was. I opened it up, and inside found a letter from someone who had found one of the bottles while walking on a beach on Cape Sable Island, NS. This is not very far from Shelburne, but it was still exciting news.

Two or three days later I received another letter, from another island nearby called the Cape. The two people found their respective bottles two days apart from each other!

I replied to both letters, and wrote to Ed to tell him the good news. I even continued to correspond with one of the people for some time, although the other person never replied a second time.

Sometimes I wonder what happened during the journey of those bottles, and what befell the other eight bottles which I never heard from again. Still, I deem it quite a success, and am very grateful to Ed, without whom I would not have been able to carry out such a great experiment.

Gulf Shores, Alabama

This year for the holidays in December, our family decided to go on a road-trip adventure. We decided to go to Alabama, USA. While our backyard was covered in snow, we thought it would be great to head somewhere a little warmer for the holidays.

We rented a place in Gulf Shores, which is south of Mobile, AL, and is on the Gulf of Mexico. The cottage we rented was only a five minute walk from the beach. I was interested to note that all the structures in the area were on stilts (beams). This is to preserve the building an case of a flood.

DCIM100GOPROGOPR7861.

We had a great time at the beach nearby. The sand was a different texture than that of freshwater lake sands. I’m guessing this is because of the salt in the seawater.

I had fun on a skim-board, which is a thin wooden board that you throw down into very shallow water and jump onto. It’s fun because you just glide barely above the sand on a thin layer of water. Beach stores sell them.

DCIM100GOPROGOPR7860.Two of my brothers also made this mosaic out of seashells.

DCIM100GOPROGOPR7858.We noticed a bunch of little holes in the sand all over the beach, and when I dug one of them up, I found a tiny land crab!

DCIM100GOPROGOPR7859.The waves were very high and powerful and we had to be careful of the undertow, which is a current that pulls against incoming waves underneath the surface, and can pull you right under.

One day we met up with some friends at the Explorium in Mobile. The Explorium is a big science centre with lots of neat stuff to look at and do. Another day we went on a boat tour of Mobile Harbor where we saw navy ships, a container ship getting unloaded, and a WWII ship which is now a museum.  Our friend Dan – who inspects ships – explained all about each of the ships we saw.

DCIM100GOPROGOPR7862.We stayed in Alabama just less than a week. We had a great time, and because we went on the off-season, there was hardly anyone else on the beach. Next time you’re looking for your next travel destination, I recommend looking into Gulf Shores, Alabama. It’s a great place to visit.DCIM100GOPROGOPR7809.

Moose Hide

IMG_0041.JPGI went to visit some friends who live in an area where a lot of Mennonite families live. While there, some of us went for a bike/unicycle ride. We stopped at the neighbours, who have a meat and animal processing shop, where hunters can bring deer or other animals to be made into summer sausage, hamburger, or – best of all – pepperettes!

DCIM100GOPROGOPR7451.When we walked in the door we saw a moose!

Later we came back to watch them skin it. They threw the legs (from the knee down) on the floor, and when I asked what they did with them, they said they throw them out because there’s not really much meat to salvage off them. I asked if I could have them and they said sure. One of my friends (whose name is Elijah) took two legs, and I took the other two. My other friend (whose name is Scout) asked if he could have the whole hide (which they where also going to get rid of because it was not in great condition) but his mom only let him have a couple pieces.

Back at my friends’ house I skinned the two legs and put the skins in a plastic bag to take home. When I went home I looked up how to tan hides and found this video which was very helpful. I then worked on tanning them. Once I finished I called my friends to ask how their moose hides had gone. Elijah, who had gotten the other two legs had only ended up skinning one of them but the one he had skinned worked out fine. My friend Scout (who had gotten a large piece of the hide) left his Moose hide out in the sun, and sadly a sudden ice storm swept through and ruined it.

Fortunately the tanning of my Moose skins went well, and I look forward to trying to make something out of them.IMG_0038.JPG