Law #1 A Scout’s Honour Is To Be Trusted

IMG_3438It is important for Scouts (and everyone else too) to be trustworthy and honourable.  So, if you say you will do something, you must do it.  Here is what Baden-Powell (B.P.) thought about in his book, Scouting For Boys:

If a Scout says “On my honour it is so,” that means it is so, just as if he has taken a most solemn oath.

Similarly, if a Scout Officer says to a Scout, “I trust you on your honour to do this,” the Scout is bound to carry out the order to the very best of his ability, and to let nothing interfere with his doing so.

If a Scout where to break his honour by telling a lie, or by not carrying out an order exactly when trusted on his honour to do so, he would cease to be a Scout, and must hand over his Scout badge, and never to be allowed to wear it again…

Often these days it is not considered that your word is trustworthy, unless you say something like “I promise”.  You should always be trustworthy, by not telling lies even in games.  If someone always told the truth, his friends would eventually learn always to trust him.  If you only tell the truth half the time, how will people ever know when they can trust you?  Here is what God thinks about it in his word, the Bible:

But let your ‘Yes’ be ‘Yes,’ and your ‘No,’ ‘No.’

You will make and keep a lot more friends if you do as you say you will, and do not lie.

Volunteering In Politics

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Because young people often have a lot of time on their hands, it is good to have something productive to do rather than just sitting playing video games all day long (although it can be fun every once in a while).  It is also good to get involved with your country so you start to understand how your government works better.

Last fall I had the opportunity to volunteer for my local government representative.  Through our many conversations, I learned a lot about how the government works in my country.

My jobs as a volunteer included assembling signs, helping put them up, and handing out information cards.  I hung information door hangers on people’s doors, walking from house to house in small neighborhoods.  I learned a lot and had a lot of fun!  I also had the satisfaction of knowing that I had a little part, however small, in the outcome of my country’s whole election.

I encourage you to find out when the next election in your area or in your whole country is, and then find out how you can help support your government representative.  Even though you might not be able to vote, I hope you will try to get involved somehow.  Learning how your country works is a very important thing for people to learn.  And I think the best way to learn is by experience.  Some of you reading this right now might even be leaders of your country some day!

So, go do some research, and find out how you can get involved in the politics of your country.  Of course, if you are still a kid, you might want to ask your parents before arranging anything. 😉